Ramesseum Publication Rendering references

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Our first primary goal : scientific publication drawings of architecture with integrated epigraphic data


A cut-through in the Akhmenu at Karnak
A cut-through in the Akhmenu at Karnak


Here is an example of the kind of plates we hope to be able to publish in the end. This is from J.-F. Carlotti's publication of a Karnak monument, the Akhmenu of Thutmes III.


For this, if a fully automatic non photorealistic render is impossible, a nicely lit render of the model at high res, including a scale, shall be used as a template, to draw in Photoshop or Illustrator with vector tools, or to insert and metrically validate existing raster drawings, as in the following example from a Karnak dataset.


A cut-through of the great hypostyle hall in Karnak rendered straight from the existing meshed dataset



This is a rather sketchy but still interesting cut-through of part of the Ramesseum by Dieter Arnold


CAD render approach

an example of a CAD render of the 1990's


Here is an already old shaded render of a CAD model of the Akhmenu in Karnak. Interestingly J.-F. Carlotti who is not particularly kin on digital renders actually published it in his volume.

Another possibility: using the same model to make renders that are closer to reality, using photorealistic version of the textured model to show scenes that are impossible to photograph in the real world

first a view of the 3D cloud gathered in Karnak's Hypostyle Hall with a Riegl LMS Z 390 scanner

3D scan point cloud Karnak Hypostyle Hall


Then an example of an unrolled column surface from the same hypostyle hall.

3D scan point cloud Karnak Hypostyle Hall


Non photorealistic renders using realistic shadowing of the scene under virtual sunlight to emulate highly evocative drawings and water colours of the 19th century - beginning of the 20th century

Medinet Habu's entrance as seen by Frederick Norden
The Ramesseum as seen in a watercolor by Vivant-Denon
one of the royal statues at Medinet Habu as reconstructed by Emile Prisse d'Avennes
The Ramesseum's second court as seen by David Roberts
Medinet Habu as seen by David Roberts
a beautiful water colour render by Hector Horeau preserved in the Griffith Institute in London
another beautiful water colour render by Hector Horeau showing a cut through elevation and plan of the Ramesseum
another beautiful water colour render by Hector Horeau showing a cut through elevation of the western part of the main hypostyle hall with reconstructed polychromy
The Ramesseum from the North Wilson
from the publication of the Oriental Institute of Chicago about Medinet Habou
from the publication of the Oriental Institute of Chicago about Medinet Habou
from the publication of the Oriental Institute of Chicago about Medinet Habou
from the publication of the Oriental Institute of Chicago about Medinet Habou
from the publication of the Oriental Institute of Chicago about Medinet Habou
from the publication of the Oriental Institute of Chicago about Medinet Habou
from the publication of the Oriental Institute of Chicago about Medinet Habou
from the publication of the Oriental Institute of Chicago about Medinet Habou
from the publication of the Oriental Institute of Chicago about Medinet Habou
from the publication of the Oriental Institute of Chicago about Medinet Habou
from the publication of the Oriental Institute of Chicago about Medinet Habou
from the publication of the Oriental Institute of Chicago about Medinet Habou
from the publication of the Oriental Institute of Chicago about Medinet Habou
from the publication of the Oriental Institute of Chicago about Medinet Habou